In defense of the iPad

John Walden, for Sound on Sound:

Of course, instead of an iPad, today’s aspiring music technology junkies could buy a computer-based system. Whatever route you take, there is still a bunch of other ‘stuff’ (mics, headphones, speakers, software) you have to acquire alongside the computing platform itself and I’d absolutely agree that the laptop (or desktop) system is likely to be more powerful than the iPad. That said, I love my mobile iPad-based music workstation and, despite its more modest grunt, it’s still a capable device for crunching zeros and ones.

However, price and power aside, lots of today’s aspiring musicians have bought into mobile devices for other reasons. For them, and for their overall IT needs, it is simply their computing platform of choice. The fact that it can do music technology is, for many, a bonus, but one they can happily exploit with relatively low additional costs for software.

The last part is tricky for schools.  For many aspiring musicians “the fact that it can do music technology” is simply not enough.  They want to “do music technology” the way the pros do, and that’s with “computer-based systems” (probably meaning laptop or desktop computers – technically stomp boxes are computer-based systems).

But yeah – when you sit back and think about it it’s pretty amazing that you can just plug a guitar into your phone and lay down tracks.  The world is crazy.

 

Hyperdub 10.1

Got my hands on this great compilation today.  If you want a handle on where earnest electronic music is headed outside of the club bangers and brostep, this is required listening.

From the Pitchfork review:

Dance music label comps serve a dual purpose: 1) provide an accessible way for non-collectors to obtain material that might’ve received limited release; 2) offer labels a way to define their legacy or current position in the music landscape. 10.1 fulfills the first function simply by existing, and effectively flips two middle fingers towards the second.

Very true.  My only gripe is that Laurel Halo isn’t on this compilation – big omission in my books.

For me, Hyperdub and Ghostly are filling the void that Astralwerks and Warp did in the 90’s – releasing truly innovative new music, signing singularly unique artists, and forgetting the rest.

DJ Rashad – Let it Go

Hello – I’m back after an extended absence involving a big project I’ll be taking the wraps off of soon.

In the meantime, enjoy some DJ Rashad – respectfully posted after his sudden and tragic death last month.  I just discovered Double Cup in January, and his posthumous work is being featured on Hyperdub 10.1, which I can’t wait to get my hands on.